Commentary

191 – Literary Criticism

The Mythcreant Podcast

In the beginning, a human told a story, and another human said it was not good. Thus was born the tradition of literary criticism, which is what we’re talking about today. We’ll discuss the different schools of criticism, whether reviews are a type of criticism, … read more »

Why English Needs Singular They

A portrait of William Shakespeare.

Despite the growing recognition of gender-neutral pronouns, many people – particularly in the writing industry – reject singular they. These traditionalists usually complain that singular they will make English worse. But English itself has something to say about that. Read more »

Five Common Harmful Representations of Disability

Captain Hook from Disney's Peter Pan

Disability is an extremely common human experience. Many people of all ages have disabled bodies, divergent minds, or chronic illnesses. Almost everyone who lives to old age will eventually experience some form of disability. This is why disability is an important experience to include in … read more »

Five Reasons Not to Write a Persecution Flip Story

So you’ve read through all the articles tagged “social justice,” and you’re convinced: Bigotry is wrong. It’s evil. And it leads to lousy writing. You want to do your bit to fight bigotry with your stories. That’s highly commendable. Now you’ve come up with an … read more »

Storytelling’s Terminology Problem

If you surf the web for tips on constructing stories, finding a new source of advice can be like vacationing in a foreign country: everyone speaks a language you don’t know. This is partly because some advice givers want their own patented terms and partly … read more »

Distinguishing Structured and Unstructured Advice

If you’re reading storytelling articles on Mythcreants, there’s a very good chance you’re reading them on other sites. As with most crafts, you might reasonably expect to hop from website to website without issue. No one worries that if they check multiple recipes for the … read more »