Chris Winkle

Chris is the founder and editor-in-chief of Mythcreants. On the side she also designs, codes, and writes stories. When she manages to escape from chronic workaholism, she likes to drink tea, wear funny hats, pet kitties, and crush her enemies at the game table.

Worldbuilding

Land Travel Before Engines

Many fantasy stories involve traveling from one city to another, often in worlds without engine technology. Before cars and trains, traveling over land was exhausting and dangerous. The logistics of a trip were completely different from today. Here’s what you should know. Read more »

Inspiration

Ten Ways to Generate Story Ideas

When storytellers are asked where their ideas come from, many don’t know how to answer. Idea generation is a personal process that relies on the subconscious mind. But that doesn’t mean you can’t learn how to harness your imagination. It’s just a matter of discovering … read more »

Meta

Top Posts of 2015

Another year has passed! In 2015 Mythcreants partnered with Patreon, held a panel at GeekGirlCon, and of course, wrote lots of juicy articles. For your year-end pleasure, here’s the highlights. Read more »

Writing

Breaking the Curse of Distant Perspective

Vast literary realms are afflicted by a writing perspective with dull personality and chafing restraints. This perspective is called distant limited, and it is pervasive because it goes unexamined by many writers. Once you recognize this malady, you can choose the writing style your work … read more »

Storytelling

Five Common Character Mistakes

Inara from Firefly

Character depiction is never simple. Even when the storyteller writes the hero’s entire life story and maintains a psychological profile, audiences may interpret the protagonist in an unexpected way. This disconnect causes many of the character issues we see again and again. Read more »

Writing

How to Narrate a Riveting Fight Scene

Neo stopping bullets in the Matrix.

Many stories depend on fight scenes for action and excitement. Storytellers are used to watching marvelous fights on screen, but that doesn’t tell us how to make combat riveting with our words. So it’s no surprise Ellie sent us this question: I was wondering if … read more »